Before My Time is about the ancestry and extended family of my four grandparents: John Samuel Krentz (Indiana/North Dakota), Margreta Tjode Hedwig (Gertie) Buss (North Dakota), Rosmer Pettis Kerr (Pennsylvania/Michigan), and Evelyn Elvina Hauer (Michigan). Archives, Labels (tags), and other links appear at the bottom of the page.

Friday, January 29, 2010

In Search of the Schulte Line, Part 10: We looked under every rock.

By Part 5 of In Search of the Schulte Line, the Bloodhound Cousins were on the trail looking for death records of Fred and Elizabeth Hebert. We couldn't find them in any of the likely Detroit graveyards, and we couldn't send for death certificates without a date of death. All we had was Evelyn Kerr's list of deceased friends and family, in which she noted that Elizabeth Hebert died in 1963.

Fast-forward to this month, January 2010, when I happened upon the Heberts' passport application. That was the stimulus that launched our research synergy once again and, moments after receiving it, Cheryl handily found what we'd just about given up hope of ever finding, the Heberts' death records. And it was no wonder we hadn't found them before. We were looking on the wrong continent!

Record of Elizabeth Hebert's death in Germany, page 1 of 4
(click to enlarge)

Elizabeth Hebert died February 16, 1963, age 86, at the St. Marien Hospital in Gelsenkirchen-Buer, Germany. The cause of her death was "myeloblast batch resulting from a chronic myeloid leukemia."

And just two weeks later:

Record of Fred Hebert's death in Germany, page 1 of 5
(click to enlarge)

Fred Hebert, age 91, died of "heart muscle defect, sclerosis, senile decay, and bronchitis" at St. Josefsheim, 5 Barbarastr., Gelsenkirchen-Buer.

Both Fred and Elizabeth were interred in the Hauptfriedhof at Gelsenkirchen-Buer, Field 9, WG, Stelle 26.

From these documents, we also learn a fourth passport number (B594629) for the Heberts. It was issued August 4, 1961, probably shortly before they left the U. S. for this final trip to Germany.

Another page indicates they were receiving social security, and gives Fred's number. Yet another page provides Elizabeth's birth date, 23 March 1876, and her maiden name, Schulte, although her parents' names are not given.

It appears the Heberts were living with a nephew, Hermann Koenig, at Hagenstrasse 29 in Gelsenkirchen-Buer. Hermann was probably a brother of Paul and Alfons Koenig. Also mentioned on Fred's record as other known relatives were Elizabeth's sisters, Maria Koenig (same address as Hermann) and Rosina Roeken (sic).

And as usual, these documents have not only answered questions but raised new ones also. Named on both death records are Mr. Charles Hebert and Mrs. Katherine Starauch, identified as son and daughter of the Heberts. My educated guess would be that Charles and Katherine were Fred's children from his first marriage. I haven't yet found any records pertaining to that marriage, so we leave that unanswered for now.

You can view or download a printable copy of all pages of Elizabeth Hebert's death report and Fred Hebert's death report at The Vertical File.

4 comments:

Jasia said...

Bravo to the bloodhound cousins! You guys work so well together. Which brick wall will you tackle next?

T.K. said...

Well, I'm thinkin' we must have peeps in Gelsenkirchen-Buer or somewhere around there... maybe even someone who knows how the Meyer got in Meyer-Schulte. And there's always Alvina Tobien, Joseph Meyer Schulte's wife... we haven't found out where she's from yet. Cheryl needs to go on a field trip, and see what turns up!

Cheryl said...

A field trip? That would need to be a trip "back to where it all began" and I don't mean Detroit!! Wouldn't Lizzie be honored to know that her life has been the subject of our sleuthing and just look at all we have discovered. Her life ended up going full circle, too..from Germany to Detroit and back to Germany. We have done well on this research.

T.K. said...

Indeed, by "field trip" I meant "Feldreise!" We could try to find some cousins in Gelsenkirchen-Buer, and I'm wondering if there are gravestones for the Heberts, as well as the Koenigs, Roehrkens, and Schultes. Surely there are! We should probably investigate some of that before you pack your bag...

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Our Family in Books: A Bibliography

  • My Ancestors in Books (a library of resources and notes pertaining to Reverend Samuel Stone, Major General Robert Sedgwick, Elder John Crandall, and other early Americans in the forest where my family tree was grown)
  • The Zahnisers: A History of the Family in America by Kate M. Zahniser and Charles Reed Zahniser (Mercer, Pa. 1906)
  • History of St. James Lutheran Church [full title: A little of this and a little of that in the 141 year (1861-2002) History of St. James Lutheran Church, Reynolds Indiana] by Harold B. Dodge, published at Reynolds, Indiana, 2002; 170 pages.
  • Lisbon, North Dakota 1880-2005 Quasuicentennial, published at Lisbon, North Dakota in 2005; 391 pages.
  • The Paschen and Redd Families of Cass County, Indiana by Alfred Paschen, c. 2005 (Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, MD); 322 pages.
  • Sheldon Community History: Sheldon Centennial 1881-1981, published at Sheldon, North Dakota in 1981; 376 pages.
  • Sheldon, North Dakota 1881-2006 - 125th Anniversary: The Queen of the Prairie, published at Sheldon, North Dakota in 2006; 498 pages.
  • A Standard History of White County, Indiana, written under the supervision of W.H. Hamelle, c. 1915 (The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago and New York).
  • The Roots of Coventry, Connecticut by Betty Brook Messier and Janet Sutherland Aronson, c. 1987 (Coventry 275th Anniversary Committee, Coventry, CT); 206 pages.
  • "Elder John Crandall of Rhode Island and His Descendants" by John Cortland Crandall; New Woodstock, New York, 1949; 797 pages.
  • "The Descendants of Robert Burdick of Rhode Island." Nellie (Willard) Johnson, Pd.B.: H & L Creations, LLC.

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